gallifreyanconsultingdetective:

dianeraeb:

siriuus:

do action movies know they can have more than one female character

Someone should make an action movie with all girls except for one guy and have no explanation or mention of it in the movie and then pay all of the actors to act surprised like they’d never noticed when they get the inevitable storm of questions. 

This one male must have a shower scene, be saved by the protagonist at least once, and fall in love with a lead female.

Don’t forget he’ll need to get paid less and all interview questions must be about what he’s wearing and how much weight be lost for the role.

When you slowly start hating someone you were friends with.

image

theycallmemos:


Get that fucking salad out of my face, Jessica

theycallmemos:

Get that fucking salad out of my face, Jessica

when you are in the epsom and you got to vote National to keep ACT out

wheninauckland:

Julie Anne - it feels deeply wrong but we know you are a list MP that is already in the mix

7passion:

Life as a student

7passion:

Life as a student

rmlgifs:

It’s not new. It’s not original. It isn’t even very interesting… but it is coming this summer! Dracula, as you’ve never seen him before… Dead!

DRACULA: It’s been Done… To… DEATH.

miketooch:

Future-me as a parent

theoddmentemporium:

Kinver Edge and the Rock Houses

I dragged my parents to see these beauties today! The Rock Houses of Kinver Edge were the last troglodyte dwellings occupied in Britain. Set high in the rock face just above Kinver, Staffordshire, the Rock Houses are said to have first been inhabited from at least the 18th century, as reported by Joseph Heely who wrote of taking refuge with a ‘clean and decent family’ in an ‘exceedingly curious rock’.

In its hey day around 40 people lived in the little community, on three levels rising up the heath. Carved out of sandstone, the houses were easy to adapt to ones needs. If a room needed to be slightly larger or a new doorway was required, the inhabitants could just chisel away. The Rock Houses were lived in until the 1960s and are now owned by the National Trust.